Other Creative Offerings

Queer History Voices Audio Tour

This weekend on May 7-8-9, join Alberta Theatre Projects for ‘Queer History Voices’ by Natalie Meisner: as part of Jane’s Walk weekend.

This dramatized audio experience tells Calgary’s queer history, street by street, block by block. By scanning a QR code at two downtown locations, audiences can enjoy dramatized readings that tell stories of Calgary’s local queer history. Check out the locations and how to access the audio performances HERE.

(exp)lore: a digital audio theatre experience

(exp)lore is a fiction anthology podcast to be enjoyed in the community while social distancing. These site-specific stories take an imaginative dive into the past and future of Calgary’s inner city. Each episode immerses the audience in a rich audio play while they explore the world through a new lens.

Listen Here

(Please be advised there is minor swearing in some episodes and some mature themes. Likely best for 13 years of age and older.)

Indigenous Girls Mural Project: Vulnerable to Valuable

Vulnerable to Valuable displays the progression of three ribbon skirts, depicting the generational impacts of passing down trauma, but also healing. The intention of the mural is to discuss and overcome gender-based violence. The creators wanted to focus on the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women’s Movement.

Read the June 2020 edition here (pages 18-20)

(The murals will become available to the public to see post-pandemic.)

A Queer Map: A Guide to the LGBTQ+ History of Calgary

The Calgary Institute for the Humanities is proud to announce the launch of the first map of The Calgary Atlas Project. This project seeks to recover crucial stories about Calgary’s past and present, stories that will illuminate in surprising ways the character of the city.

In A Queer Map: A Guide to the LGBTQ+ History of Calgary, Mark Clintberg, working with research by Kevin Allen, has mapped the early histories of Calgary’s Queer communities. The University of Calgary has a long history of engagement with LGBTQ2S+ issues and this map is a fantastic start to a project that layers multiple histories, experiences, and geographies over our dominant urban narrative.

Get a printed copy here.

 

 

 

First Nations Stampede: A Guide to First Nations history at the Calgary Stampede

The Calgary Institute for the Humanities is proud to announce the launch of the first map of The Calgary Atlas Project. This project seeks to recover crucial stories about Calgary’s past and present, stories that will illuminate in surprising ways the character of the city.

The map describes in detail the First Nations participation in the Stampede and the ways that participation changed the nature of the event. It highlights stories from the Calgary Stampede that are not often heard—stories that focus on the sometimes-controversial histories of the Stampede that are an important part of its legacy.

The artist, Adrian Stimson, a member of the Siksika nation, has mapped the events using Indigenous ways of knowing, using pictographs in spiral and linear arrangements painted on a buffalo robe. The map serves as much to inform and remember as it does to decolonise and reclaim.

Watch the presentation by artist Adrian Stimson here.

Get a printed copy here.